Guess How High This Croc Flies Out Of The Water For A Chunk Of Meat!

Think your dog is good at 'begging' for scraps? This croc beats him hands down.

Written by Outdoor Beasts Staff on September 19, 2017

Think your dog is good at ‘begging’ for scraps?
This croc beats him hands down.

The guy in a boat with meat on a stick helps show the rest of us exactly how powerful and explosive a Croc can be.

This croc’s vertical took him WAY out of the water, hind legs well over the waterline, with all his power coming from that mighty tail.

Video: @tbfrost | Please see link in my profile to read the entire Australia crocodile conservation story on the National Geographic Magazine website. I've shared this video before, and while many of you have seen it many of you have not – and nonetheless , it is worth re posting to remind the world that crocodiles are – I think anyways – the best designed animal on the planet. Their jaws slam shut with incredible power, anywhere from 3,000 to 5,000 pounds per square inch, perfect for grabbing prey and holding on and crushing bone. Across their legs and backside they have both osteoderms and scutes. The osteoderms are a bone filled scale that forms an almost impenetrable armor. The scutes, also formed with bone, help protect the crocodile but, as one of my instagram followers reminded me, serve another purpose: their design and formation on the back of the crocodile create cross currents that cancel each other out which is why when they swim it barely disturbs the surface of the water. And then we have their tails, pure muscle so strong it can propel a crocodile completely out of the water! like this one on the Adelaide river in the Northern Territory of Australia. There is so much more to share about crocodiles and why they are perfectly designed for what they do: their eyes, even their stomach acid! To learn more read the article and follow me @tbfrost

A post shared by National Geographic (@natgeo) on

Here’s the text that photographer put alongside the photo:

Please see link in my profile to read the entire Australia crocodile conservation story on the National Geographic Magazine website.
I’ve shared this video before, and while many of you have seen it many of you have not – and nonetheless , it is worth re posting to remind the world that crocodiles are – I think anyways – the best designed animal on the planet. Their jaws slam shut with incredible power, anywhere from 3,000 to 5,000 pounds per square inch, perfect for grabbing prey and holding on and crushing bone. Across their legs and backside they have both osteoderms and scutes. The osteoderms are a bone filled scale that forms an almost impenetrable armor. The scutes, also formed with bone, help protect the crocodile but, as one of my instagram followers reminded me, serve another purpose: their design and formation on the back of the crocodile create cross currents that cancel each other out which is why when they swim it barely disturbs the surface of the water. And then we have their tails, pure muscle so strong it can propel a crocodile completely out of the water! like this one on the Adelaide river in the Northern Territory of Australia.
There is so much more to share about crocodiles and why they are perfectly designed for what they do: their eyes, even their stomach acid! To learn more read the article and follow me @tbfrost

He, obviously, is totally wowed by his subject.

Good on him for getting this shot.

If you’re interested in the NatGeo article he was referencing, it can be found here.

It’s actually a really interesting piece arguing how … in this habitat at least… conservation efforts and hunting can be mutually supportive.

Some excerpts:

Frost has spent the last three years documenting saltwater crocodile hunting in northern Australia, where the gigantic animals have made a comeback from near-extinction in 1971 to as many as 100,000 today in the Northern Territory alone.

Locals began to call for massive culls as the swelling numbers made them nervous.

To ease concern, the Northern Territory decided to allow a limited number to be hunted each year. The hunt gives people a way to make money from the crocodiles, creating an incentive to keep them around. The tanned skin of a 14-footer can be worth up to $10,000, Frost says. And a skull can sell for as much as $3,000.
This concept, sometimes referred to as “if it pays, it stays” conservation, has been tried around the world in many other contexts. In a lot of cases, it fails—resulting in poaching of the protected animal. But Frost’s years of on-the-ground reporting have convinced him that in Australia, when it comes to saltwater crocodiles at least, the approach works.

If it’s properly thought out, hunting can be an important piece of the conservation puzzle.

We have seen similar successful results with helping large African Game animals.
Stossel’s New Plan To Save Rhinos After Enviro Bans Failed Utterly

Know someone with lingering doubts about hunting being ethical? Hook them up with this.

Get Doug Giles’ book, Rise, Kill and Eat: A Theology of Hunting from Genesis to Revelation today!

 
If a person looked to Scripture and paid particular attention to the passages within the Bible that address the topic of hunting, then they’d walk away thinking not only is hunting animals tolerated but it is endorsed by God. And that’s exactly what this little book is about: proving that God, from Genesis to Revelation, is extremely cool with hunters and hunting. I’ll go out on a biblical limb and claim right off the bat that you cannot show me, through the balance of the Bible, that the God of the Scripture is against the responsible killing and the grilling of the animals He created. ~Doug Giles

 

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