The Birth Of The Far…Uh…Farr Rifle

Written by Outdoor Beasts Staff on April 21, 2016

 

The Farr is legendary!

And yes…

It shoots far!

It was 1921. Warren G. Harding was President; WWI was barely three years in the past and the Emergency Quota Act had recently been enacted limiting the number of immigrants admitted into the United States. On September 9 of that year, a 62-year-old man dressed in a khaki shirt and dungarees strode up to the firing line, rifle in hand. It was George Farr’s first time at Camp Perry and perhaps things were not going as well as he would have liked. The 1903 Springfield service rifle he had drawn the day prior had problems holding its zero and now he was preparing to fire from the 1000-yard line with a replacement gun he had never shot before at that distance.

Outdoor Beasts The Birth Of The Far Rifle

Fellow shooters on the line may also have wondered about this tall Washington State resident’s choice of spotting scope. Farr had fashioned a crude monocular by cutting a pair of French opera glasses in half. But many of the other competitors were too tired to speculate. After all, it was 4:30 pm, the last relay of the day and the light was starting to fade.

Outdoor Beasts The Birth Of The Far...Uh...Farr Rifle

Farr loaded his rifle with a clip of five rounds and began to fire. His choice of ammunition was government issue, loaded at Frankford Arsenal and fitted with tin-plated projectiles to limit barrel fouling. More experienced shooters on either side of Farr were using commercial Remington match ammunition like the master shooters of the day, including Marine SGT John Adkins, who had just won the Wimbledon Cup with this ammo.

Read more here

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.