Family Lives Way Off The Grid, They Grow Their Own Weed And They Clearly Don’t Give AF!

When your buddies talk about living 'off the grid' do they usually mean ANYTHING this extreme?

When your buddies talk about living ‘off the grid’ do they usually mean ANYTHING this extreme?

These guys live hundreds of miles from anyone. They see their family once a month.

They carry their guns everywhere — because they’re surrounded by bears.

David, Romey, and their 13-year-old son, Sky, are the only people living on their 250-mile stretch of the Nowitna River.

The hippy, weed-loving family have cast off society to carve out their own life, forging a world where only the three of them matter.

…There, the prepper family live a life with nothing to worry about… apart from marauding bears, hungry wolves, forest fires, thin ice, disease and the -65 degree temperatures.

…But it’s not all weed and board games: the closest hospital is hours away, and the family have had run-ins with falling trees, thin ice and wild animals on more than one occasion.

On David and Romey’s first ever night at the cabin, their supplies were raided by a bear, and the creatures have been a constant threat ever since.

Soon after, Romey was forced to shoot one whilst David was off fetching more essentials.

She said: “Being by myself, I had to skin it, tan the hide and deal with the meat, which took a whole day”.

Do they ever contact the outdoor world? Sure.

They can hook up power if they want to — and their boy plays GTA from time to time.

They go to town for supplies or medicine. (200 miles away)

They work from time to time in a local gold mine.

And once a year, they take a month to visit family in Alabama.

These guys take off the grid living pretty seriously. How seriously? If his wife ever gets an internet connection, he’ll leave her.

Read the full article here

 

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